Posts relating to Kosada Inc.
Kosada is Developing a Next-Generation Programming and Performance Environment for Multimedia Artists

Posted by jmcc on 2012.11.02 @ 21:48

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Kosada is developing Vuo, a next-generation visual programming environment. It will enable multimedia artists to create powerful real-time audiovisual projects, data visualizations, and apps — all without writing code.

With Vuo, non-programmers will be able to create their own multimedia software for interactive art and music performances, animations, visualizations, games, special effects, museum exhibits, kiosks and other artistic projects. Rather than writing code in a traditional computer language, the composer will drag and drop building blocks onto a canvas, connecting those blocks with cables to create the composition. Unlike most programming environments, artists will be able to interact with their Vuo compositions while they are running, allowing for live improvisation. [more...]

Compiling code with the Clang API Compiling code with the Clang API

Posted by jstrecker on 2012.08.15 @ 10:46

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Have you tried Clang yet? Clang is an open-source compiler, under active development, that aims to replace GCC for compiling C, C++, and Objective-C. Compared to GCC, Clang is faster, while generating comparably fast code, and prints more useful error messages.

Clang is also better for developers who want to compile code programmatically. Unlike GCC, Clang is designed to be both a tool and an API. That makes Clang’s source code easier to understand and reuse. And, for those of us working on projects incompatible with GCC’s GPL license, it’s good to know that Clang is distributed under the BSD license.

Kosada is working on a cool new project that’s built on top of Clang and its underlying framework, LLVM. While using Clang for this project, I’ve been pleased to see how simple it is to write code that builds other code. Simple in retrospect, anyway! The code I wrote turned out to be simple, but it took lots of digging through the Clang source code to figure out what to write. So here’s my first contribution to the Clang community: two examples of using the Clang API to build code programmatically. [more...]

Drupal Queue API example: enqueue in form submit handler, dequeue when cron runs Drupal Queue API example: enqueue in form submit handler, dequeue when cron runs

Posted by jstrecker on 2012.03.14 @ 21:39

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Need to store up some items and process them en masse in a cron job? That’s a perfect use case for the Queue API (for Drupal 7+) or the drupal_queue module (the backport for Drupal 6).

Concrete example: One of our consulting clients was using a synchronous webservice for their retail store locator. We needed to create a form where store owners could change whether they’re listed in the store locator. When a store owner submits the form, should she have to wait around while our site sends her change to the store locator webservice? We didn’t think so. So we decided to use Drupal’s Queue API, which lets us save up all the store owners’ changes and send them to the webservice in a batch.

Here’s a simple example of adding items to a queue in a form submit handler and processing them in the next cron run. [more...]

Git-ing Drupal contrib patches done Git-ing Drupal contrib patches done

Posted by mradcliffe on 2011.06.18 @ 15:06

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In not-so-recent news, Drupal migrated the drupal.org project repository from CVS to Git in late February, 2011. My experience with Git previous to this has been as a user fetching source code of x.org, mesa, dri, and other various Linux and Unix projects.

As a user, not a developer, I found the Git work flow confusing. I did not need to make local commits and it was hard to wrap my head around bringing in changes from multiple remote repositories.

As a PHP developer, I first grasped the work flow at Columbus GiveCamp 2010 when I needed to make a github account for the branch of the Audio module we hacked on. As well, some Ruby guy had a nice Git work flow diagram, which I promptly forgot all about until the not-so-recent event above. [more...]

Are you sure you want to localize? Are you sure you want to localize?

Posted by jstrecker on 2011.06.10 @ 13:36

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It’s a wonderful fact about the world that humans have thousands of living languages. And a wonderful fact about many software development environments that they provide ways to create versions of applications localized into the most common of those languages. But before localization (or should I say world-readiness) sweeps you off your feet, let me tell you about some unexpected difficulties with Kineme’s first localized application. [more...]

Drupalcon tidbits

Posted by bbinkovitz on 2009.03.07 @ 12:44

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Cool things I learned about at Drupalcon DC include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • There is a Drupal 6 theme starter app whose maintainer is constantly improving it.
  • Usability studies have proven that I am not the only one who couldn’t figure out WTF to do with the welcome screen on my first Drupal install.
  • A lot of the modules that seem like they should be in core but probably won’t be in Drupal 7, are left out because Token is unlikely to be included and many of them rely on Token.

As usual, more coming…

DrupalCon 2009: First Impressions

Posted by bbinkovitz on 2009.03.05 @ 09:13

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I can positively affirm that the free tee-shirts given out with DrupalCon 09 registration are quality. The medium size fits me perfectly and the cotton is nice and soft and thick. Overall very wearable. Caveat: they’re not pre-shrunk so they will shrink.

I have a lot of actually relevant info to post but that will have to wait. Topics will include:

  • Theming tips and best practices
  • Awesome stuff (eg. fields!) that will be built-in to Drupal 7
  • Awesome stuff that won’t be in core in Drupal 7, and why it won’t (Hint: if it depends on something that won’t make core, it can’t go in core either)
  • Some other stuff.

Overall it’s been enjoyable and packed with information so far. I only wish I could go to more sessions.

memset() vs. bzero() — Ultimate Showdown

Posted by cwright on 2009.01.14 @ 21:58

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There are a few functions used to zero out memory on most unix variants. memset(), bzero(), and calloc() are all a few such functions. calloc() isn’t very useful for clearing already allocated memory, so it won’t be appearing much more in this article. However, the other two are somewhat more interesting than meets the eye. [more...]

Silicon Dioxide (SiO₂)

Posted by cwright on 2008.07.30 @ 11:50

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QuartzCrystal LogoIn the wee small hours of this morning, Kineme Interactive Media released its first commercial product, QuartzCrystal.

QuartzCrystal is an offline renderer that turns Quartz Compositions into portable QuickTime movies. It supports 3rd party plugins, as well as patches that do not work in safe-mode-only environments (such as QuickTime Pro). It also supports software scene antialiasing, so if you have a Mac with plenty of RAM and a hard-core video card, you can make spectacularly beautiful renderings of your plugins, effects, and compositions.

Beside QuartzCrystal, the only other product that renders and encodes compositions to movies is Apple’s own QuickTime Pro, which doesn’t support plugins, unsafe patches, or antialiasing.

QuartzCrystal Main Window Screenshot

Some Crazy MacBook Pro Checkerboard Graphics Corruption / Crash Some Crazy MacBook Pro Checkerboard Graphics Corruption / Crash

Posted by smokris on 2008.02.15 @ 13:34

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Last summer Kosada purchased a MacBook Pro for the president of one of Kosada’s consulting clients. It’s been a great improvement over the old Dell laptop he was formerly using, and, though he was initially worried about whether he’d be able to grasp the new UI, he seems to have picked it up quickly, and he reports that he’s been loving it.

But this morning he called me with a rather odd problem:

“I hooked up my Treo and started syncing it, then walked away for a few minutes. When I returned, the screen was covered with a bunch of squares, and I can’t do anything.”