Posts relating to Apple Inc.
Getting HTML5 video to work with iOS Mobile Safari Getting HTML5 video to work with iOS Mobile Safari

Posted by mradcliffe on 2013.05.17 @ 09:50

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I’ve been researching issues regarding serving HTML5 video content to iOS devices this past week. Here’s an outline the issues and some concise answers as to how iOS Mobile Safari 6 will handle HTML5 video. This post won’t touch on video encoding.

Mobile Safari’s QuickTime component does not handle HTTP requests the same as it does normally, say for a web page. Instead [more...]

Apple Radar vs. Time Apple Radar vs. Time

Posted by smokris on 2011.12.02 @ 10:01

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I recently filed an Apple Bug Report, which was marked as a duplicate. The actual bug isn’t terribly important, but the difference between the serial number of the bug I filed (10426480) and the serial number of its alleged duplicate (3323328) — about 7 million — surprised me. Just how old was this still-unfixed bug?

I slogged through the lists.apple.com archives and the bugs users have manually posted on openradar.appspot.com to compile a list of Radar Numbers and the dates they were filed, and ended up with this: [more...]

Are you sure you want to localize? Are you sure you want to localize?

Posted by jstrecker on 2011.06.10 @ 13:36

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It’s a wonderful fact about the world that humans have thousands of living languages. And a wonderful fact about many software development environments that they provide ways to create versions of applications localized into the most common of those languages. But before localization (or should I say world-readiness) sweeps you off your feet, let me tell you about some unexpected difficulties with Kineme’s first localized application. [more...]

Example of IOSurfaceCreateMachPort and IOSurfaceLookupFromMachPort Example of IOSurfaceCreateMachPort and IOSurfaceLookupFromMachPort

Posted by jstrecker on 2011.01.27 @ 00:30

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The IOSurface framework lets you pass a reference to an IOSurface – a kind of pixel buffer – from one process to another. Here’s an example of how to pass an IOSurface through a mach port using the functions IOSurfaceCreateMachPort and IOSurfaceLookupFromMachPort. [more...]

mach_port_t for inter-process communication mach_port_t for inter-process communication

Posted by jstrecker on 2011.01.14 @ 11:14

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Mach ports are a way for processes to communicate in Mac OS X. (Other mechanisms for inter-process communication include distributed objects and sockets.) A mach port is an endpoint of a communication channel. If 2 processes hold endpoints to the same communication channel, then one process can send messages to the other.

Mac OS X provides wrappers around mach ports – NSMachPort and CFMachPort. But sometimes you have to drop down to the native mach_port_t API.

Don’t do this on whim. [more...]

Release: Move Message To Sent Folder 1.2 Release: Move Message To Sent Folder 1.2

Posted by smokris on 2009.11.20 @ 13:00

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Move to Sent Menu Screenshot

  • Works on Snow Leopard (with Mail.app running in either 32bit or 64bit).
  • After moving a message, automatically selects the following message (instead of selecting nothing).

Mailbundle attached.

memset() vs. bzero() — Ultimate Showdown

Posted by cwright on 2009.01.14 @ 21:58

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There are a few functions used to zero out memory on most unix variants. memset(), bzero(), and calloc() are all a few such functions. calloc() isn’t very useful for clearing already allocated memory, so it won’t be appearing much more in this article. However, the other two are somewhat more interesting than meets the eye. [more...]

Kineme is now (c)ubercoolische

Posted by bbinkovitz on 2008.11.18 @ 16:30

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In case you’re not super minimal like we are and don’t already know, Richie Hawtin is the Berlincoolest musician ever. His label, M-NUS, is celebrating its 10th anniversary with, among other things, a blue lighted cube (pictured left). Ali Demirel, visualist for Richie Hawtin, includes Quartz Composer in his arsenal of interactive and realtime media tools, and has been using a couple of Kineme tools to control and interact with his visuals.

He used Particle Tools to get some interesting effects in the visuals displayed behind the musicians during their set. He modified the “Fire” sample to fit with the other visuals and the music.

He also used Kineme File Tools String with URL to access the information acquired by the Cube. Members had RFID chipcards, and it would get their name whenever anyone held up their RFID chipcard to it. Demirel then chose the right moment to display their name in the visuals.

For an interview with Mr. Demirel, including links to videos, check out the full story on Kosada.com.

90% Easy, 10% Impossible

Posted by cwright on 2008.09.13 @ 19:19

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90% Easy, 10% Impossible Pie ChartFrom time to time, I get these insatiable urges to read what other Cocoa developers blog about. Sometimes they’re informative, sometimes they’re funny, sometimes they read like college textbooks, and sometimes they’re just downright terrible, but I read them anyway. It comes and goes in waves, every 2 or 3 months. A couple weeks ago, one such binge happened, and I started reading Aaron Hillegass’ critique of NSController (since I was hating it at the time, and wanted to feel justified in hating it). In the critique, the following statement was made: [more...]

QTKit QCheatKit

Posted by cwright on 2008.08.26 @ 12:11

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QuickTime LogoApple has been busily working to 64-bit-ify all of the frameworks they plan to continue supporting into the future (Snow Leopard and beyond). However, QuickTime is scheduled for some nice Cocoaification, so it didn’t get much 64-bit love. QTKit, the 64-bit impostor, pretends to be the 64-bit way forward, but unfortunately this is far from useful.

QuickTime is all C function stuff, rather verbose and boring. It’s also 32-bit only. The 64-bit front end on it is a framework called QTKit. However, 64-bit QTKit is little more than an impostor that secretly makes things messier during the 32-to-64-bit transition. [more...]